THE EVIDENCE

Maintaining Limits on Days/Hours of Sale

The longer alcohol establishments are open, the higher the rates of alcohol consumption. Studies have found that increasing the hours of sale by two or more hours was associated with an increase in alcohol related harms in on-premise settings (bars and restaurants). Similarly, when cities or states repealed limits on sales of alcohol, there was an increase in consumption and harms. By limiting the hours and days in which alcohol can be sold, cities and states can work to reduce these public health harms.

Resources

Hahn, R. A., Kuzara, J. L., Elder, R., Brewer, R., Chattopadhyay, S., Fielding, J., ... & Task Force on Community Preventive Services. (2010). Effectiveness of policies restricting hours of alcohol sales in preventing excessive alcohol consumption and related harms. American journal of preventive medicine, 39(6), 590-604. Available online here.
 

Middleton, J. C., Hahn, R. A., Kuzara, J. L., Elder, R., Brewer, R., Chattopadhyay, S., ... & Task Force on Community Preventive Services. (2010). Effectiveness of policies maintaining or restricting days of alcohol sales on excessive alcohol consumption and related harms. American journal of preventive medicine, 39(6), 575-589. Available online here.                                                                                                                             
 

Popova, S., Giesbrecht, N., Bekmuradov, D., & Patra, J. (2009). Hours and days of sale and density of alcohol outlets: impacts on alcohol consumption and damage: a systematic review. Alcohol & Alcoholism, 44(5), 500-516. Available online here.

Comprehensive advertising, promotion and sponsorship bans

Exposure to alcohol advertisements is associated with an increased chance that young adults will start drinking, and those who already drink will increase their consumption. Though the research is more limited, particularly in the U.S., a French prohibition on the advertisement of alcoholic beverages on television and cinema, as well as banning alcohol company sponsorship of sporting or cultural events. CITE


Note: this has been identified as one of the World Health Organization’s three “best buys,” a designation given to policy options that are highly cost effective, feasible, and culturally acceptable to implement.

Resources

Bloom, D. E., Chisholm, D., Jané-Llopis, E., Prettner, K., Stein, A., & Feigl, A. (2011). From burden to" best buys": reducing the economic impact of non-communicable disease in low-and middle-income countries (No. 7511). Program on the Global Demography of Aging. Available online here.


Anderson, P., De Bruijn, A., Angus, K., Gordon, R., & Hastings, G. (2009). Impact of alcohol advertising and media exposure on adolescent alcohol use: a systematic review of longitudinal studies. Alcohol and alcoholism, 44(3), 229-243. Available online here.
 

ABOUT US >

The U.S. Alcohol Policy Alliance (USAPA) is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization translating alcohol policy research into public health practice. The Alliance is committed to ensuring that local and statewide organizations engaging in alcohol policy initiatives have access to the science, resources and technical assistance, including support for organizing efforts, required to engage in informed decisions and actions in translating alcohol policy research into public health practice.

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